Strength exercises for kids

30 Muscle Strengthening Exercises for kids

Alice Taylor Exercises for kids

30 Muscle Strengthening Training And Exercises For Kids

Strength exercises for kids
30 Strength exercises for kids

Strength training is a type of physical exercise depending on resistance to induce muscle contractions which make the strength, anaerobic endurance, and size of skeletal muscles.

A child’s strength-training program shouldn’t just be a scaled-down version of an adult’s workout program.

You may ask how to get stronger muscles for kids? or how to get muscles for a 10 or 12 year old?

The following muscle strengthen exercises are designed to help kids build a sense of balance and control and give them an awareness of their bodies.

In this article, For kids will teach parents how to perform a list of exercises for kids to strengthen their body muscles and to be fit.

As with any sport, it’s wise to have children visit a doctor before beginning a strength-training regimen.

Each of the exercises in this article should be learned without resistance.

Later, when proper technique is mastered, small amounts of resistance (body weight, band, or other weight) can be added.

In general, as kids get older and stronger, they can gradually increase the amount of resistance they use.

30 strength Exercises for kids

1- Beginner Push-Ups

How to do a push ups?

Tell the children: Begin facedown, with your hands and knees on the floor.

Place your hands directly beneath your shoulders.

Extending your arms and pulling your belly button toward the spine, raise your body.

Then, using upper-body strength, slowly lower your body again until your chest almost touches the ground. Do as many push-ups as you can.

2-  Wall Push-Ups

* Prop: A wall 

Wall push-ups are a great way to teach anybody how to master a push-up.

Tell the children: Stand about an arm’s distance away from a wall with your legs together.

Place your hands on the wall just a little farther apart than your shoulders.

Lean forward, touch your nose to the wall and then push back to the starting position. 

Repeat this exercise 20 times, making sure to keep your heels on the floor and your body in a straight line.

3- Plank Position

Tell the kids: Get on your hands and knees, keeping your arms extended straight below your shoulders and your fingers pointing forward.

Then straighten your legs behind you and use your back and stomach muscles to lift your stomach off the floor until your whole body forms a straight line from head to toes.

Make sure not to let your rear end stick up in the air or your back and stomach sag in the middle.

Hold this position for 15 seconds.

4- Biceps Curls

* Props: A small, spongelike ball or balloon for each participant.

Tell the kids: In a standing position, with your right arm bent at a 90-degree angle, place a ball or balloon between your biceps and forearm.

Close the forearm to keep the ball in place.

Squeeze the arm tightly 10 times, rest, and then switch arms.

5- Stick ’Em Up

* Prop: A chair for each participant

Tell the children: Sit in a chair without your back touching the back of the chair.

Pull your belly button toward your spine.

Lift your head toward the ceiling, but keep your chin parallel to the ground.

Roll your shoulders back and down, keeping them relaxed. Bring your arms up, elbows bent, to shoulder height.

Slowly raise your arms up overhead, making sure not to let your shoulders come up.

Return your arms to the starting position. Breathe and repeat 10 times.

6- Bent-Over Lateral Raise

* Props: A chair and two small balls for each participant

Tell the kids: Hold a ball in each hand. Sit on the edge of a chair with your legs together.

Bend forward from your hips so your upper body is parallel to the floor.

Pull your belly button back toward your spine. Begin with your arms hanging straight down, palms facing in.

Slowly raise the balls to your sides with straight arms until your hands are even with your shoulders.

Keep your arms straight, but with your elbows slightly bent and your palms facing down.

Squeeze your shoulder blades together as you lift the balls.

Hold for 15 seconds, breathe, and then slowly lower your hands to your sides.

Repeat this workout for kids 10 times.

7- Triceps Push-Ups

* Props: A chair for each participant

Tell the children: Sit on the edge of a chair with your legs hip-distance apart.

Place your palms down on the edge of your chair at your sides, with your fingertips curling underneath so they point toward your bottom.

Push down with your arms and lift your bottom an inch off the chair, holding the position for 5 seconds.

Immediately sit back down again.

Repeat this exercise 5 times.

8- Overhead Reach

Tell the children: In a standing position, bring both arms up overhead.

Imagine you are climbing up a rope. Leaning slightly to the left, concentrate on stretching and lengthening your body.

Lower your right arm until your hand is at shoulder level.

Return to a standing position and repeat, leaning to the opposite side.

9- Baseball Swings

Although this is a baseball-related game, no equipment is
necessary.

Tell the children: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and clasp your hands together in front of your chest.

Pull in your belly button, keep your chest high, and extend both of your arms to the right as if you’re about to swing a baseball bat.

Keeping your shoulders down, slowly bring your arms across your chest as far to the left as possible.

Slowly reverse the direction of the movement to return to the starting position.

Repeat this movement 10 times. Use muscle control, not speed, to perform this exercise.

10- Wheelbarrow

This is a fun exercise, and kids enjoy being the wheelbarrow.

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the kids: Have your partner lie facedown on the floor.

Stand between his feet, facing his head, and grasp his ankles.

Keeping his hands on the floor, he will push up with his arms until they are straight, and you will lift his ankles until you are standing straight and holding his ankles at your sides.

Then, with head up, he will walk on his hands forward 20 steps while you walk forward and support his body and he tries not to let it sag.

When you are finished this strength training, switch roles.

11- Wheelbarrow Push-Ups

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the children: Have your partner lie facedown on the floor.

Grasp her ankles and raise her body into a Wheelbarrow position (#10).

With her hands on the floor, she will push up with her arms until they are straight. Then, with head up, she will lower her chest back toward the floor to push up again.

Try not to let your partner’s body sag. After doing this exercises for kids 10 times, switch roles.

12- Stairway Push-Ups

* Prop: A set of stairs Standing on the floor, be sure that the children’s feet are not slippery or that they are wearing shoes with nonslippery soles.

Tell the children: Start in a standing position in front of the stairs.

Then lean forward as if you were falling and place your hands on the same step on which your shoulders would rest if you were to continue falling.

Slowly push up and away from the stairs as if doing a push-up.

Return to the straight-arm position and repeat the complete movement 20 times.

13- Throwing a Ghost Ball

Tell the kids: Pretend to throw a baseball. Go through the entire movement several times with one arm and then switch to the other arm.

When you switch, you may find that it feels very different.

Repeat the movement several times with each arm.

Variation Have the children pretend to shoot a basketball, going through the same process as with the ghost baseball.

Be sure to try this fun exercise with both arms.

14- Punching Arms

Tell the children: Imagine that a punching bag is hanging in front
of you.

Using both arms, punch fast, slow, and from different angles.

If one hand is leading the punches, switch hands and try this exercise with the other.

Repeat this strength training several times.

15- Overhead Press

Tell the children: With both elbows bent and both hands in fists and resting just above your shoulders, extend your arms straight up overhead.

Return to the starting position and repeat the complete movement 20 times.

This exercise can be done with 1–2-pound weights.

16- External Rotation

Tell the children: Lie on your left side on the floor with your legs together and your knees slightly bent.

Rest your head in your left hand or lie on your outstretched arm.

Position your right arm along your side, bend your elbow at a 90-degree angle, and rest your right forearm on your stomach, with your palm facing your stomach.

Keeping your upper arm stationary, slowly raise your right hand as far as you can.

Then slowly lower your right hand toward your stomach again.

Repeat this exercise game for kids several times and then switch sides.

17- Triceps Push-Aways

* Prop: A wall

Tell the kids: Stand with your back leaning against a wall and your arms down along your sides, palms touching the wall.

Push yourself away from the wall using the palms of your hands.

Repeat the motion 10 times.

18- Basketball Hook

Tell the children: Stand tall with your arms at your sides and your feet shoulder-distance apart.

Raise your right arm up and out to your side, hand at waist level to start, pulling your belly button back toward your spine as you do.

Slightly tilt your body to the left and, in a semicircular motion, extend your right arm back and up toward your shoulder.

Reach up and over your head toward the left side as far as you can go.

Perform this movement very slowly.

Repeat this training for kids and teens 10 times and then switch sides.

19- Boxing

Tell the children: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart.

Bend your arms at the elbows, bringing them toward your body and keeping your fists at chin level.

Moving from the waist and not the knees, slowly bend your upper body down and to the left, as if avoiding a punch thrown at your head.

Return to the center and alternate side to side 20 times.

20- Speed Bag

Tell the children: In a standing position, bring both arms up to chest height in front of you.

Bending at the elbows, bring your fists together, one on top of the
other.

Imagine a speed bag in front of your chin and begin rotating fist over fist as fast as you can, repeating the movement for 30 seconds before reversing the rotation.

Be careful not to punch yourself.

21- Towel Tug of War

* Props: Two bath towels for each pair

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the kids: Stand facing your partner.

Take two bath towels and loop them together, so that each person has two ends to grip in his hands.

As your partner begins to pull the towels toward his chest, challenge his strength by adding some resistance.

Repeat this exercise 20 times and then switch roles.

22- Towel Pull-Downs

* Props: A bath towel for each pair

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the kids: One partner kneels on the floor and takes hold of one end (two corners) of a towel.

Meanwhile, the other partner stands above, holding the other end of the towel.

The object of this movement is for the kneeling partner to pull down on the towel while her standing partner challenges her strength by adding resistance.

Repeat this exercise 25 times.

23- Chest Squeeze

* Props: A small-to-medium-size firm ball for each participant

Tell the kids: In a standing position, take hold of a ball between the palms of your hands.

Holding the ball at chest height, press your hands firmly into the
ball.

Bring your arms up overhead while squeezing the ball and then lower them.

Repeat this exercise 30 times.

24- Lateral Lift, Palms Down

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose
partners.

Tell the children: Stand facing your partner.

Have your partner raise his arms out to his sides at shoulder height, palms down. Place your hands lightly on top of his hands.

Have your partner slowly lift his arms up, while you apply light resistance.

Hold the press, rest, and repeat 25 times before switching roles.

25- Lateral Lift, Palms Up

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the kids: Stand facing your partner.

Have your partner raise her arms out to her sides at shoulder height, palms up.

Place your hands lightly on top of her hands. Have your partner slowly lift her arms up, while you apply light resistance.

Hold the press, rest, and repeat 25 times before switching roles.

26- Frontal Lift, Palms Down

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the children: Stand facing your partner.

Have your partner raise her arms straight out in front at shoulder height, palms down, Place your hands lightly on top of her hands.

Have your partner slowly lift her arms up while you apply light resistance.

Hold the press, rest and repeat 25 times before switching roles.

27- Frontal Lift, Palms Up

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the kids: Stand facing your partner. Have your partner raise his arms straight out in front at shoulder height, palms up.

Place your hands lightly on top of his hands. Have your partner slowly lift his arms up while you apply light resistance.

Hold the press, rest, and repeat this workout 25 times before switching roles.

28- Biceps Resistance

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the children: Stand behind your partner.

Have her make fists, with her hands turned palm up.

Next, asking her to keep her elbows at her sides, have your partner bend her arms at the elbow.

Place your hands on top of her fists.

Instruct her to bring her fists toward her shoulders while you apply gentle pressure.

Repeat this strength exercise for kids 25 times and then switch roles.

Variation: If one partner isn’t quite tall enough to stand behind the other and perform this exercise, he may stand in front of her.

29- Reverse-Fly Resistance

Divide the group into pairs or have the players choose partners.

Tell the children: Stand facing your partner. To begin, place your arms
straight down in front of your body, shoulder-width apart, with your palms facing each other.

Your partner then places his arms inside of your arms by your wrists.

The object is to have your partner push your arms open while you provide resistance.

Repeat this exercise 10 times and then switch roles.

Note If one partner is taller than the other, have the tall partner sit in a chair.

Variation: If the partners are strong, they can perform this exercise one arm at a time.

30- Outdoor Playground

The time spent together with your kids at a playground may be one of the biggest benefits of a playground workout, but the equipment definitely still provides exercise.

Climbing on the monkey bars challenges a child’s upper body as she holds on to each bar, feet off the ground, and moves from one bar to the next, using only her hands.

The teeter-totter provides an excellent opportunity to strengthen legs, as she pushes up and then softly lands using only her legs.

And pumping the swing higher and higher is a good workout for both leg and the stomach muscles—for kids and adults.

Doing these strength exercises activities for children regularly in a daily basis will make children more active and more strong.

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